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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 238 (some duplicates have been removed)
're not sure the sort of extent of that? >> that -- >> educated guess. >> that's the big question. that is our question, thank you very much for the top democrat on the house budget committee is expressing some optimism that a deal can be had to avert tax hikes and massive spending cuts. chris van holland joining us from the capitol. thank you very much, congressman. >> good to be with you. >> do we know nothing from the secret talks? >> well, we don't know a lot, andrea, but you presented it very well in that lead-in there. there are a couple of things that have changed. number one, you now have the face-to-face meetings between the president, the speaker of the house. that's obviously good news. always better than not talking. sending, you have this growing awareness on the part of congressional republicans that their earlier position was unsustainable. the idea that they would allow the economy to go down the tubes, allow tacks to go up on virtually every american all in order to protect the bonus tax breaks for high income earners. more and more republicans are recognizing that that's not
for right now, and give our kids the kind of education they need to succeed in the 21st century. i want to make sure america leads the world in research and technology and clean energy. i want to put people back to work rebuilding our roads and our bridges and our schools. [applause] that's how we grow an economy. i want us to bring down our deficits, but i want to do it in a balanced, responsible way. and i want to reward -- i want a tax code that rewards businesses and manufacturers like detroit diesel right here, creating jobs right here in redford, right here in michigan, right here in the united states of america. [applause] that's where we need to go. that's the country we need to build. and when it comes to bringing manufacturing back to america -- that's why i'm here today. since 1938, detroit diesel has been turning out some of the best engines in the world. [applause] over all those years, generations of redford workers have walked through these doors. not just to punch a clock. not just to pick up a paycheck. not just to build an engine. but to build a middle-class life for t
people, educate them, maybe some good of good will come 20 years down the road. >> you mentioned the justice component of many of these islamist parties. this is a response today corruption of these u.s.- sponsored regimes. -- to the corruption of these u.s.-sponsored regimes. for the record, i am against corruption. >> it goes back to the point at bottom made in my remarks that islamists did not win, the non- islamists lost. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services, by being so corrupt, by being ossified. islamists are there, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity, through violence or nonviolence. we did not even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, which is a very important issue. they are there like vultures to reap the benefits, the carrion of these regimes. we can build, and we can help them, help the alternatives build better alternatives. >> question in the far corner over there. >> i am with the center for national policy. thank you for the debate. my point here is that there's been a suggestion that once islamists come to power, t
progress forum titled investing in the future, higher education, innovation and american competitiveness. this is 40 minutes. >> it is my great privilege to introduce gene sperling, director of the white house national economic council and assistant the president for economic policy. gene sperling also is a former senior fellow at the center for american progress, pro-growth progressive. and the connection between innovation, education, ensuring we have an economy that works for everyone. i want to say having served in the administration, there is no one in the administration who is more focused on america's long-term competitiveness, short term competitiveness, midterm competitiveness, when the president is talking about issues which are critical to him, america maintains its edges in the global economy, and all of its citizens to students to people dreaming about being the next generation of innovators, policies that helped achieve that. higher education k-12, insuring universities are still leading and citizenry is well s was sub human capital, not the best term. and achieving their d
're not jeopardizing our future by, you know, putting in dramatic cuts to education and health care and innovation. we've got to have balanced spending cuts. we have to make sure we bring savings out of entitlement programs like we did with the affordable care act. $716 billion in savinging out of medicare and added eight years of insolvency when we passed the affordable care act. president obama put $360 billion on n. savings on the table in his proposal to the republicans. so we've got it all on the table. the republicans have given us a letter with a, you know, sort of vague outline of five things that they want to consider. tax reform is important. that we have to do over the long term next year. hopefully we can try to get some agreement quickly. but the bottom line is that democrats have put a whole bunch of things that we're willing to agree to on the table and the republicans need to show their cards and stop playing chicken with our economy. >> congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz, thank you. >>> and -- >> thank you. >> matt and liz, she makes the point about republicans and whether the con
to education, the new number one in most cases a scandinavian country, what is the credit sauce? we'll dig into it. but first here's my take. as we debate whether the two parties can ever come together and get things done, here is something president obama could do probably by himself that would be a single accomplishment of his presidency, end the war on terror. for the first time since 9/11, an administration official has raised this prospect. said in a speech to the oxford union last week, that as the battle against al qaeda continues, there will be come a tipping point as so many of the leaders and operatives of al qaeda have killed or captures such as al qaeda as we know it has been effectively destroyed. our efforts should no lo loaninger -- this is the longest period that the united states has lived in such a situation. longer than the civil war, world war i, world war ii, it grants the government extraordinary authorities and effectively suspends civil liberties for anyone the government deems the minute and also keeps us at a permanent war feeting in all kinds of ways, endsing thi
not subtraction. we did a very bad job with outreach with people of color, we alienated college educated women, the gay vote and the hispanic vote. if the republicans are serious about growing as a party and about moving forward not only for 2014 but the presidential election, we need to grow and expand our base and we didn't do it this time. >> when the election was in process, why were you not standing up and condemning publicly some of the things that were repeatedly being said that were mildly racist, deliberately sexist, often divisive of people. why didn't you stand up and -- >> quite to the contrary. i have been very, very difficulty ebt db. >> you have been on the show regularly -- >> i have been on other networks and shows. >> we're not interested in those. >> of course not. >> sorry. >> but i've been very consistent about saying the republicans have done a terrible job about african-american outreach. it's just disgraceful. haven't done it. i have consistently gone on the sar and said when are we going to realize and say folks of people are going to want to vote for president obama f
that the states get for that deregulation will go to education, health, and helping people with drug or a call problems. -- or alcohol problems. >> still to come, the duchess of cambridge is released from hospital, but now the couple has some serious decisions to make. the government of the philippines made an emotional appeal to four more to be done about climate change they after a deadly typhoon swept through the country this week, killing at least 300. from manila, here's the latest. >> a life -- alive against all the odds. carlos was inside his house when it was buried beneath a torrent of mud and water. >> we were hearing like the wind that night. we did not know where to run. the wind and rain brought by the typhoon were so strong i thought we would not survive. >> but for every purse and pulled from the rubble, there are many others still missing. all their relatives can do is can the list of names and wait. >> what else can i think of about what happened to my husband? i hope to see him alive, but if not, i just want to see him again. >> those who survive have lost everything. depende
want our taxes to go to serve the policies of the country, education, charity, health care. i think that president obama's right about this. but i think compromise is going to be necessary to achieve some result. >> let me bring in abbe. your father is known as a moderate republican and a good dealmaker, a man who used to negotiate. what do you make of this? and what does he make of this? >> i think morale is so low right now. the country's so divided. especially for my generation. we're the ones that are going to be handed down the $60 trillion deficit. they will come to a deal. but right now, it's political theater. and it's probably going to look like the simpson-bowles. that will come full-circle again. >> here's a problem the republicans have got themselves into. is obama has been very clever here, the president. i think what he's done is skillfully said to the public, if he goes over the fiscal cliff, the republicans are prepared to make the entire middle class to pay more tax to save 2% of the wealthiest americans paying a little bit more. and that's a very bad position for t
. >> is our education system outdated? >> no. >> our union advocacy, is that outdated, how they go about fighting for it? i don't know. that question was put on the table. whether factories are shut, that means jobs have left. if you look at wages enjoyed by workers in right-to-work states, i think it should be put on the table. where do they fare? i have not done the analysis so it's hard to say. >> it's a question, though, willie, whether you want the job or not. >> right. >> i asked bob riley, i've said this 1,000 times, it seems extraordinarily important if you're a union member in the northeast, and like me, you want your factories running again. i asked bob riley, i don't understand, why did mercedes go to tuscaloosa county, alabama, instead of filling up the factories in connecticut? 15 minutes away from yale. or in rhode island. 20 minutes away from brown. i mean, right by some of the most highly trained, brilliant minds in the world. that's easy. the work force rules are so insane there, there's no way that mercedes or bmw or airbus would ever dream of going to those states. do
can see that the situation is actually worse. there's no change with education, with infrastructure or health care. corruption, poverty and hunger haven't decreased. >> lehrer: head of the u.n.'s large haiti missi here acknowledges the slow pace but says there has been some progress on the massive rebuilding task, a much smaller number of tent dwellings since last year, for example. >> if haiti were a glass and it's gone from being 10% full to 15% full, let's recognize that without in anyway diminishing the fact that you've still got 85% of the glass full. >> reporter: but fisher says many of the problems were endemic to haiti long before the earthquake. >> what we've seen is people who are in camps because of enrenched poverty. many o these people were hidden before in slums. they're now in the open in camp. that is a function of underdevelopment? it's a function of weak governance. it's a function of lack of alternative. >> reporter: he says one of the biggest problems is that haiti's government crippled by the quake in a corrupt reputation hasn't been able to lay out national pri
of money and use that money for education and other things. >> all right. thank you for that. clearly so many more questions, legal questions, and for that we'll skip over to our joey jackson, legal commentator who joins us live from atlanta now. i think one of the big questions that also still remains for all of those guys out there having all sorts of fun in the park, there is still a federal law that says you can't smoke it. you can't carry it. you can't buy it. you can't sell it. you can't do anything when it comes to dope and the feds. how are these two entities going to compromise in this respect? >> with great difficulty. that was some party they had there. the federal law is pretty significant here because of course as you know back in 1970 we had a controlled substance act under nixon and one of those drugs that the fed said, you know what, was illegal and as you mentioned you can't manufacture and you can't produce and you can't import and you can't distribute and you can't sell would be marijuana and that's problematic because you have something called the supremacy clause. it
and education choices parents with special needs kids make. had it passed, crpd would have been the law of the land under the u.s. constitution supremacy clause and trumped state laws and could have been used as precedent by state and federal judges. again, that's not true. why the fudging of facts? we asked senator santorum on the program tonight. he declined, and like the others that won't explain themselves, we can guess their motivations and frankly it's so baffling we're taking wide guesses and we don't want to do that. the treaty supporters say that politics and a paranoia about the u.n. trumped the rights of the disabled in this vote. ted kennedy jr. is a health care attorney and advocate for people with disabilities. when he was 12 years old he lost his leg to bone cancer. there's a picture of him taken with his dad six years after that. he's a strong support either of the u.n. disabilities treaty. i spoke to him earlier today. >> it seems like you guys lost based on something that had nothing to do with the actual treaty? >> it's true. it's a sad day for people with disabilitie
pornography charges. robert fenn was arrested back in june. he taught special education students. investigators say that the access to child pornography websites. >> of montgomery county office will student charged with bringing on unloaded gun at the school is expected in a hearing today. he went to magruder high school on thursday morning even though he was suspended. an officer told them that he was not supposed to be there. they found a weapon in his back. -- in his bag. >> he used to be a good kid. now bringing a weapon to school, it is just not right. >> abc 7 news but several startling messages on his twitter account. he tweeted, as soon as i stepped in school, it is savage time. >> it will be tough getting around using metro this weekend. here is what you need to know. there will be no red line service between -- shuttle buses will be available. there will be single tracking on the blue number lines. orange line trains will not be running because of work on the yellow line bridge over the potomac river. you can find this all at wjla.com. macy's is pulling out all the stop
can't. >> you can't, you shouldn't. >> right. >> when you start slashing education, when you start slashing r&d, transportation -- >> it's over. >> -- what you're doing is, you're slashing about 3%, 4% of the budget. and you're leaving the parts of the budget that blow a hole in the deficit and destroy this economy over the next 20 years. >> by the way, we won't go over the cliff for all the reasons we're talking about. even if we do, my friends on the street tell me, it's not a disaster. it's baked in. because we're going to get it done even after the fact. so you're talking about a few points in the market. >>> we're just moments away, joe and i will be removing -- >> oh, no! there it is! >> ow! >> it's all for a great cause. >> i don't know if it's that good. >> i don't know. is this going to be good television or kind of yucky? okay. we'll be right back. americans are always ready to work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never takin
cannot go to school. i think malala will become the symbol of a girl's rights to education. >> well said. i couple of contemporary issues, one here and one back in our homeland. first one is the fiscal cliff. you're one of the keener economic minds in great britain. what do you make of what's happening in america? the old expression if america sneezes, we all catch a cold back in europe, as true as ever. what do you think should be happening here to try and get a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff happening? >> i have no doubt people are working very hard to get a deal. i wish their discussions -- well, now we have the president re-elected and we have a new congress. i think it's right they get them to the business of sorting this out. i think america's got to think that what it needs to do is get growth in its economy as well. and it needs to get growth by trade and exporting. i think what we're missing at the moment is a global agreement whereby big powers try to rebuild confidence in the world. yes, have you to sort out the fiscal problems. yes, you also have to have growth because that's
from budget cuts. florida hack looking to reform education in the state. your college major greatly affects how much money you make. according to the census data, engineering majors earn $3.5 million over a 40-year career, more than the median earnings for all majors, $2.4 million. those with education majors earn the least, $1.8 million. brooke? >>> bottom of the hour here, i'm brooke baldwin. thanks for being with me. you see the crowds, you see the president. he's speaking at redford, michigan, not too far from detroit. take a listen. >> so in addition to seeing the best workers in the world, you've got -- you've also got all this cool equipment. i want to try out some of the equipment. but secret service wouldn't let me. they said you're going to drop something on your head. hurt yourself. they were worried i would mess something up. and i -- they may not admit it, but i'm pretty sure they were happy the secret service wouldn't let me touch the equipment. now, it's been a little over a month since the election came to an end. [ applause ] so it's now safe for you to turn your te
and said it would have given the u.n. oversight of the health care and education choices parents with special needs kids need to make. had it been the law of the land it would have trumped state laws and could have been used as precedent by state and federal judges. that is not true. so, why the fudging of facts and we asked senator santorum on the program. he, too, declined. we can only guess the motivations and frankly some of this is kind of so baffling we'd be taking wild guesses and we don't want to do that. the treaty supporters including senator kerry say that politics and a paranoia about the u.n. trumped the rights of the disabled in this vote. ted kennedy jr., the son of the late senator kennedy is a health care attorney and advocate for people with disabilities. when he was 12 years old he lost his leg to bone cancer. that's a picture taken six years after that. he's a strong supporter of the treaty and not ginn up on it. i spoke to him earlier today. >> it sounds to me, it's one thing to lose based on facts and another thing to lose based on things that are completely
of education which the court held it was unconstitutional. so why wait until 1967 to hear the case about interracial marriage. here are all of the states that had laws on the books. banning interracial marriage. by 1967 only 16 states still had the laws on the books. in the decades between 1947 and 1967 the years the supreme court was staying mum on the issue, most states decided on their own. the court was following on their heels, following the heels of public opinion. this is a big debate in the legal world. is the supreme court influenced by american public opinion? these are nine people who could completely ignore the will of the people. they are appointed for life. they can totally ignore us if they choose. many legal experts say that's not how it works. they are swayed by what the people think about issues. they announced they would hear two cases involving same-sex marriage. that's huge. they would hear the prop 8 case out of california. that's the california ballot proposition which amended the california constitution to define marriage between a man and a woman. the court will
education, published poems, journalism, and now this journalistic memoir. how do you -- you're now the most visible member of your generation of the family, of the generation before you, there's only one survivor, a woman not much involved in public life, how do you interpret your inherent? do you see yourself as a leader in some way? do you reflect on what your responsibilities are? how do you interpret your inherent? >> it's bad to think of it that way. it's that thinking that got us here in the first place. the idea that six letters of a last name somehow qualify anyone for leadership is dangerous and served pakistan dangerly, or, rather, it has not served pakistan so i never wanted, actually, for as long as i can remember, i wanted to be a writer, always. that -- or an actress or a swimmer. [laughter] my father was not pleased about the other two choices. i'm doing what i always thought i would be doing, what i always wanted to do, my heros growing up were always journalists, writers, and i think the notion of dynasty is one that has to be repudiated in my sense because we've seen what
investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. every human being is unique. and there is one store that recognizes it. the sleep number store. the only place in the world you'll find the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. an exclusive collection of innovations that totally individualize your sleep. perfectly comfortable pillows that adjust to your size and shape. temperature-balancing bedding. dual warmth comforters. all designed around the sleep number bed: a bed with dual-air technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs. each of your bodies. in the name of human individuality: the sleep number collection. discover how our sleep professionals can individualize your sleep experience. exclusively at one of our 400 sleep number stores nationwide. sleep number. comfort individualized. this holiday season, give the gift that's magical: the innovative airfit adjustable pillow at special 30% savings. >>> half past the hour. look at your headlines r
to educate him. and i am very passionate as many americans are about our second amendment rights, and so i was originally just trying to explain to him. i wasn't trying to be nasty. i was really trying to make him understand where this debate was coming from, and he backed me into a corner and so i came back with a musket. >> well, i think that musket thing was absolutely terrific. but i've got to ask you, i need some help here. i'm going on the piers morgan show tonight. we're going to talk about taxes and regulation spending. so i'm not going to tweet, carol. i'm actually going to be there signature across from him. what should i do? >> i think you'll be fine. piers kind of tends to go to the socialist side of things. he's from britain originally, and he doesn't understand the capitalist system all the time. so i think if you and i just keep educating him, keep explaining to him things like the second amendment, like the free enterprise system, like capitalism, i think eventually it will get through to him. >> how is free enterprise doing? how is free market capitalism doing? i'm kind of
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ (trolley dings.) - hi, neighbour! we're playing at katerina kittycat's house today. - hello, daniel tiger, meow, meow. hi, neighbour. - hi, katerina kittycat. - hee! hee!
of cutting spending is not working. last week, demonstrators protested against cuts to the education budget. like the queues outside employment offices, protests are also becoming more common. >> the eurozone may be having problems, but german exports are surging. in the third quarter, they went up 3.6% over the same time last year. >> that is mainly because german companies have been selling more goods to countries outside the eurozone. >> times are tough for countries like spain and portugal. the economic downturn in southern europe meant that manufacturers saw their exports to some countries shrank more than 10% year-on-year, but growing demand from overseas more than balanced out the losses on the european market. the total value of exports within the european union dropped by just under 1%, but business was booming in the united states, up 26%. that rise outstripped even the increase seen from china. german cars especially remained popular overseas. i of german exports continue to sell at this rate, they could reach a record 1.1 billion euros for 2012. >> how did companies react to the
to talk about how they get health care, how they educate their kids, he has to talk about a lot of things that republicans traditionally don't like to talk about when it comes to certain groups of people. that is the test for marco rubio and paul ryan. >> what about chris christie and bobby jindal? >> christie is in temporary quarantine because of his behavior in the last week of the election. he is in talk. -- detox. >> detox on the jon stewart show. >> you have bobby jindal, kelly ayotte, ted cruz -- unless you are barack obama, you don't imagine yourself as president before you even serve in this and it. [laughter] he will have to wait. obama, of course, is the one exception. but this is a strong young outfield. mitch daniels and in jeb bush on the outside. what this tells you is what could have been in 2012. you remember the line of it republican candidates earlier this year, it was not exactly a credit to the party. and 20 debate heard them. -- hurt them. >> the quarantined governor christie and the new jersey has a 72% favorable job rating among his constituents, the highest ever re
education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine, could you be mine ♪ ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - hi, neighbor! today is fruit picking day! i hope we get to pick strawberries. do you like strawberries? they are my favorite fruit. - hi, daniel! are you excited to pick fruit for the whole neighborhood? - yes! i can't wait! - me neither. - hi, trolley! - hello, trolley. he
to education, health, and helping people with drug or a call problems. -- or alcohol problems. >> still to come, the duchess of cambridge is released from hospital, but now the couple has some serious decisions to make. the government of the philippines made an emotional appeal to four more to be done about climate change they after a deadly typhoon swept through the country this week, killing at least 300. from manila, here's the latest. >> a life -- alive against all the odds. carlos was inside his house when it was buried beneath a torrent of mud and water. >> we were hearing like the wind that night. we did not know where to run. the wind and rain brought by the typhoon were so strong i thought we would not survive. >> but for every purse and pulled from the rubble, there are many others still missing. all their relatives can do is can the list of names and wait. >> what else can i think of about what happened to my husband? i hope to see him alive, but if not, i just want to see him again. >> those who survive have lost everything. dependent on the government and aid agencies for basic sup
do not have access to a public school education. it affords them huge rights and for the united states to not be in the vanguard, we have been in the forefront of disability rights and disability rights has always been a bipartisan cause in -- from the rehab act of 1973 to special education where people like my dad worked with senator orrin hatch, so many other republicans in a bipartisan way because disability crosses every single socioeconomic barrier. so i think what's upsetting about this vote, disability law that was never political before is politicized. >> besides john mccain, former senator dole, you had dick thornburgh, former attorney general who i guess is the father of a disabled child? >> that's correct, yeah. >> if anybody would know about the impact of the u.s. law, the former attorney general of the united states would have a pretty good idea if this impacted u.s. law. >> i think that's a very good point. we did have eight republicans and i take my hat off to them because they had to face very stiff pressure by the far right not to join with the democrats to vote
, the majority of those illegal immigrants are not even high-school educated, lacks skills, like education. my god. and they do so rejecting that law, that bill and prevent it from becoming law because they want to have a lottery. for crying out loud. the absurdities compound themselves. >> in general we have to recognize that the individual entrepreneur with special skills and contributions to american produce all the jobs, and they are the ones who are getting rich, who are punished by any increase in marginal tax rates. the already rich -- lou: what about the young man or woman in this country who is not an entrepreneur, is not a big shot, is not in middle management in a big corporation. they won a break. they won an opportunity. they want to live the american dream. why can't the republicans talk to them? >> i hink that they are being talked to. a great speech the other day in which he specifically addressed this aspiration, widespread among all americans to rise up. this is what supply-side economics is. it is surge of economics. it is not trickle-down as some people caricatured. lou: y
for emergency contraception. joining me now is dr. laura burman a sex educator and a therapist and the host of in the bedroom on own. dr. burman, first of all, let me tell you i think this is probably one of the more outyaj just things i have seen this week. >> more than banning christmas. >> laura: i'm away from politics a lot this week. this? i have a young daughter and i think of a doctor telling a mom to leave the room so he can tell a young girl, maybe she is a christian girl, doesn't believe in this. her religion doesn't believe in this. telling the young girl well, if you have sex, can you use this morning after pill which includes things like dangers like thrombosis, pulmonary embolism. you can get a heart attack. you can have severe bleeding. retinal thrombosis. all sorts of hazards associated with taking that which is a big big big dose of hormones for young girls. how you can defend, this doctor? >> okay. well, first of all, i know this is a hot button topic. doctors are not telling girls if you have sex you can use this prescription. what the academy is recommending is that the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 238 (some duplicates have been removed)